Autoimmune Diseases in Women

Autoimmune Diseases in Women

Lupus is one of the autoimmune diseases in women. This disease affects approximately two million women in the United States alone, and the number is growing. This disorder is far greater in women than in men, but the symptoms can be very similar in males and females alike. The symptoms are swelling, redness, joint pain, fatigue, hair loss, vomiting, anemia, and skin rash.

Autoimmune diseases such as Lupus are usually diagnosed when a woman has high levels of estrogen. This condition is called androgenic alopecia, which occurs when the body creates too much of the hormone estrogen. Women with this disease have abnormal deposits of the hormone estrogen in their tissues and organs, which cause the illness. When a woman with Lupus is diagnosed with elevated estrogen levels, she may experience some of the following symptoms: muscle pain, fatigue, hair loss, heightened sensitivity to cold, nausea, and anemia. There are other side effects that may occur such as vision problems, diabetes, and high blood pressure.

The treatment for Lupus usually involves a combination of medications and surgery. Lupus patients who cannot tolerate standard medicines should be under the care of a rheumatologist, or immunologist specializing in the disease. These doctors will help determine the best course of action for their patients and will work closely with the patient’s doctor in diagnosing and managing any side effects as well as controlling the symptoms. Many researchers have found that there is a strong correlation between the hormones and immune system functions, and that certain types of therapies can actually strengthen the immune system and consequently reduce the likelihood of acquiring immune-related diseases.